The assignment for this week at cep812 from the MAET Program, where we discuss the application of Educational Technology to Issues of Practice, had the class thinking about how to become 21st-century smart.

The work entitled The Anti-Education Era: Creating Smarter Students Through Digital Learning, recently released by James Paul Gee, served as the ground theory for our arguments in response to the big question “What limitations prevent us from solving big, complex problems smartly?”. Here’s a summary of Gee’s ideas and my personal take on the topic.

Please let me know your thoughts.

Comments
  • Jonathan Langdon
    Reply

    Some good summarizing points from Gee’s book. I found it intriguing when you talked about your experience with the “When Can You Trust the Experts: How to Tell Good Science from Bad in Education” book. I’ll have to read that some time. I’m always annoyed by teaching fads that come and go and aren’t really supported by good science (like the learning styles – it annoys me how so many people still teach about it when there is no empirical evidence for it – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory_of_multiple_intelligences#Lack_of_empirical_evidence).

Leave a Comment